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technologies foundation is proud to support to the contrary on pbs our foundation seeks to advance science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients
that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of america's rise in industrialization. herbert hoover, when i got to the commerce building, and why would your name be in the commerce building, the president responsible for the depression, there's a lot of republic for hoover. he was not the best president, but a great commerce secretary. he was the secretary of commerce and under secretary of everything else, and he was working for calvin coolidge, and you know what hoover did? he believed in the american economic system, and he and calvin coolage, the apos
of the century, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they have a lot of good public health things being done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they missed. the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. today when we land, 2010, these are the untries that borrow money to the richest when they have their problems. >> in my mind t this raises two questions, or two amazing results from this. there have been thousands of years of human history and everyone was stuck on the lower left for thousands of years, it has been 200 years that you have all of this activity and how come some countries are still stuck? >> it is easy to understand. the best message today is that most of the african countries are now in fast economic growth. they have corrected the wrong market ideas they had 20 years ago, and they have a much better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are so
read or ever went. today this optical character recognition software, this whole technology that was developed initially and refined so that a blind person could read a book is being used in all kinds of settings. we have heard a little bit about the happy trust and that sort of thing. all kinds of waste is being used today. i happen to be excited. but my refresh will braille display with little pens the pop-up in downtown little actuators, it's expensive technology. multiply that by 32. a little bit expensive, and too expensive for a lot of people. so we have developed synthetic speech. it was pretty primitive at first and not particularly easy to understand. it sounded like this. >> chapter one, almost midnight in virginia when the phone rang in the home and two men came out the front door hastily crossing the, very this warm up the driveway onto the deserted road. >> now, if you think that is a pleasant way to read a book -- [laughter] they have been proved it with time. it can now sound like this. >> chapter one, it was almost midnight in virginia late for the farm lands
new technology fosh trailing and surveying. but the country is taking steps to bring its goals into reach. earlier this month, manila hosted an international meeting for countries that use geothermal power. >> it's an exchange of experiences, knowledge and realistic knowledge transfer. >> reporter: the organizers also hosted the tour of geothermal power stations in the philippines. the delegation from kenya visited this facility. the visitors found that japanese technology is widely used in the philippines, a japanese firm constructed this plant. 33 years later it is still operating at full capacity. >> we are very impressed because of the standard the availability rate is over 95%, which means that it is available most of the time. we feel that this is an example we ought to emulate. >> a japanese government official also joined the tour. like the philippines, japan has a high level of volcanic activity. it is the third largest geothermal energy reserves in the world. but geothermal makes up less than 0.3% of its energy mix. the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant in 2011
's a d ph, t rx or h s b, we are all one big hurdle to come and as part of my plan i made technology to cut through base businesses a top priority for me the work is well under way supervisor and it's important that it get done in a way that it's thorough and leads to improvement for at this's small business and is that will take time because we know that the plan is more important than and action and i want to give ouch indicate on real work being date of birth to help the small businesseses. this november we launched enterprise zone web appear and it requires businesses to hail in an licks and application fee and we replace that had with an online app where businesses can apply for these credits and pie the fee on time and so now business and is manufactures and other businesses can save time while saving money at the same time. a new tool called smart pdf is being utility liesed by a majority of departments to make it easier for businesses to fill out applications online. departments such as tax and treasure and entertainment commission are now accepting online payments but the b
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
. this committee could give us a sense of direction. you have to commit yourself to high-risk technology. you reduce the time it takes to go to mars. you do it. we can develop technologies along those lines. it will take the committee's decision to give nascent those kinds of instructions to move it forward. there are ways to reach out for some of the other things we are doing. since i left congress i've been involved with the ffrdc. they recommend that at least some of the nasa centers near to that kind of model. you can have both a government funding stream going into the operation as well as outside money coming in to do other things. that allows you to have some other streams of money that is not depend on the appropriations process. seems to me this committee could come up was someone along those lines. that allows you to look forward as well as find the resources necessary. that is what i'm trying to suggest. think that is possible. i've worked with these companies looking to do exciting things. they would love to have nasa as a partner. you have to find out a way to find the ways for n
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every mjor high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate profits are taxed at the corporate level. and they are taxed again at the individual level. with the dividend and catal gains taxes. george bush, to his credit, tried to do something about that and he chopped the dividend and capital gains tax down to 15%. the effect of that was to reduce the incentive for corporations to
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
kind of mobile system or a smaller subset. when you mentioned technology, i had forgotten to bring up that we have three reverse vending machines where you put your bottle in and get the nickel back, instead of the other way around. it's an old technology that didn't work to well in the '80s that has been revised. if you go to canada or europe, it's very common there, even on the east coast it's very common to. and they have gotten much better machines so you can now put a machine like that in front of the store. >> is that at whole foods at 4th street? >> no, it's at the safeway at 4th street and one at clement and 7th, safeway and one i believe at the marina safeway. >> are they being used? >> yes, they are. >> they are kind of limited, again, if someone comes up with a shopping cart it kind of shuts it down, but for the family or for folks, that is kind of the small-scale solution. that if we get the prices of those down, they are a little expensive at the moment. that could provide convenience in a lot of neighborhoods. and then you would need that distribution system to coll
to the experience of a woman like maria montessori. the third principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
between the reader and writer that however that happens when need to encourage it. technology is bringing us someplace else. as long as we keep the artist in our fold in keep readers and writers connected we will be okay. >> directing your energies like continuing the trustee in the preservation of all that means billion don't care whether it's physical or digital. >> and $0.1 the agency that i had, because i hate to speak exclusively, a love affair with the printed word. not on how something was presented, we were very public oriented. so you do everything you possibly can to move into the public domain. that implies you use every conceivable restaurant. we are in the knowledge development and the knowledge dissemination. we do a film. we preserve will books. we help finance the writing of new books. then we try to bring the public in texas to analysis. therefore we are very big into digitization. one of my favorite quotes, the archivist to lexus said particularly in the area of research, many young people, scholars from if it is in on the internet it doesn't exist. that's a fairly aweso
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
, one of which is directing the department of technology to host quarterly radio communication stakeholder meetings with the department of emergency management, sfmta, the public utilities commission, police, fire, and the motorola bay with staff to ensure there is clear and consistent communication about the status of the current and future planned radio communication projects, and directing the sfmta to provide regular reports back to coit and their subcommittees on the project -- on the progress of this project. in addition, in terms of the regular projects for the city, coit has directed the department of technology to do a study as there is not a plan for the current facilities, the condition of those facilities, and recommendations on how to proceed for other city departments' requirements, technical specifications, timing and a budget for the rest of the city to move forward for their -- to upgrade their radio and data communications. i would also note that the regional motorola bay width system regarding that project in february of 2012, the u.s. congress enacted the mi
'm going to go down the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears,
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >>> hello from new york, i'm chris can hayes heave with richard wolffe and the great heather mcgee, carl smith, the university of north carolina chapel hill, contributor to a blog. and socket sony, the migrant workers advocacy group. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going t
that galvanized indians. >> our kids were going to be whoever they were going to be. >> but technology can help couples pick the sex of their child. the consequences and the concerns even here in the bay area. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, southern california: a womad a girl died after a car plowed into a bus benchn riverside. thi >>> developing introduce out of southern california. a woman and a girl died after a car plowed into a bus bench in riverside. this afternoon's crash also injured two others. it's unclear what caused the car to mount the sidewalk. >>> highway 1 near big sur is back open tonight. caltrans closed that road sunday after a rockslide. this week an emergency contractor cleared it and fixed the road and stabilized the hillside. the highway reopened to two-way traffic about an hour ago. >>> you don't have to pay to ride on muni tonight. the transit agency is offering free rides to celebrate its 100th birthday. buses, the underground, cable cars are all free. you can still hop on no charge until 5:00 tomorrow morning. >>> big fans. '60s. '70s and '80s the dmv has something new for you. cbs
, even in the face of all these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put i
. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spe
win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >> kelly: a quick check of the headlines. four people have been killed in a plane crash in russia. investigators say the airline careened off the runway and caught fire. no word yet on what caused the crash. >>> the windy city reaches a tragic milestone. chicago police say the city has logged its 500th homicide of the year. the latest victim was shot in the head outside a convenience store. >>> former president george h.w. bush's condition continues to improve. a family spokesperson says he has been moved out of intensive care unit, but remains hospitalized for a bronchitis-related issue. >> heather: as lawmakers try to hammer out a budget deal, president obama is also pushing for another more scaled down proposal. in the meantime just in case that doesn't happen. one, that according to many critics would only deal with half the problem. so is this really the best course of action? first, listen to what the pr
business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. you are either going to scramble to survive or take advantage of the unprecedented opportunity. that's what we'll talk about today. each of the panelists are waiting. i still hope that nan talese comes. she was taking the train and should be writing soon. we will see if she does. we will certainly bring her up to 10. and i would like to also give a quick overview of each author's career and their philosophy and how that philosophy has perhaps changed in the course of their career. first up is niko pfund. he joined new york university press in 1990 and wrote to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on l
boulevard at 7:00 tonight but state senator along with a chp believed technology also could be a major deterrent. the thinking hind proposed crack down is to address what jerry hill says is a high rate of drunk driver who's don't  b. >> there are 161,000 dui arrests and convictions in california. in 27% were repeat offender autos a second conviction would require a driver to buy and install an ignition intercept device this, is video post bid several manufacturers showing how devices work. a breath sample is taken and the car starts only if a driver passes a test. law enforcement says check points helped to intercept drunk driver asks take them off the streets. redwood city police officers have checked 15,000 vehicles so far this holiday period. and played 18 arrests, they support the bill as a deterrent. >> this legislation being propose today is actually needed to be added as part of the arsenal that we have in detering people that may not just have the will, dedication or moral fortitude to not drive drunk. >> it costs about $100 but requires ongoing cal braigs. that can run $50 to
of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide u
guess since those days there has been one important improvement, one technological improvement, that we use expensively to create interoperatability and that is ip networks built of sdparate systems and the network allows us to operate. as you see from our demonstration as you checked in this morning, as you ridge stered this morning, san francisco talking it oakland, talking to this ship, talking over cellular, talking across and with different networks. the challenge for interoperatability is beginning to be met, i would say, the challenge for interoperatability at the same time is about to get much greater. we as a nation are about to embark on the most ambitous, most challenging communications endeavor that we have ever attempted, which is the creating of purse net, the public safety broad band or 4g network. and with that brings the promise of new challenges for sure in interoperatability and new capabilities that we have never had before. in fact, no other country is as far along as we are, even though we're just starting. what we see is the opportunity there to interoperate i
of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. comfort individualized. save 50% on the final closeout of our silver limited edition bed plus special financing through new years day. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. >> when the president has to quote yogi berra, you know it's tough. that was president obama lamenting the state of affairs in washington, d.c. indeed, today's congress is on track to go down as the least productive congress since recordkeeping began. the 112th congress will come to a merciful end in early january. it has passed 219 bills that have actually been signed into law by president obama, according to the "huffington pos post". many of them insignificant measures l
taking a look at the big technology stores of 2012. stories of 2012. >> catherine: san francisco's muni railway is celebrating 100 years. as part of the centennial - service on all buses, light- rail lines and cable cars will be free untilfive a-m tomorrow. if you don't have any plans for new year's. >> they are offering extended until 3:00 a.m.. there will also be offering additional trains in and out of san francisco to accommodate new year's eve crowds. also, muni will be free. caltran will be offering free service with the extended hours and there will be for extra trains out of san francisco. there will be 4 extra trains --, also, with free between 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m., and extended service on the broadway shuttle. this shuttle will run from 7:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. on the year's eve. there will also be offering extended service on in several routes. if you are planning on driving keep in mind that between 11:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. along the embarcadero there will be long traffic delays because of the fireworks near the ferry building. charles clifford, kron 4. >> tonight at 6:00 p.m. we are
absolutely everything without the help of technology at all. we met up with the defending national memory champ to learn a few things about what he can do and how it can help the rest of us. once again, my co-anchor bill weir. >> reporter: they say dogs have a short-term memory of about 20 seconds. honestly, mine's worse. >> jack of spades. jack of clubs? >> nope. [ laughter ] >> reporter: and i'm done at two. it is all the more humiliating because the guy sitting next to me can memorize the order of an entire deck of cards in 63 seconds. just one of the skills that makes nelson the reigning national memory champion. and here's the most amazing part. there is nothing extraordinary about his brain. >> ten of clubs. ace of spades. six of diamonds. >> reporter: do you have a photographic memory naturally? >> no. my memory is just average. >> reporter: it all began when his grandmother got alzheimer's and then he got scared. >> i was really kind of concerned for myself and what that might mean for me in the future. >> reporter: so in searching for mental drills on the internet, he stumbled in
attention. their day-to-day has become more structured and less free flowing. and, technology is also having an impact, smartphones and email mean it's rare people are every truly alone with their thoughts. >> if you allow yourself some time to breathe, some time to play, it refreshes you, it helps your mind function better. >> reporter: while not every industry may be ready to introduce play corners in their workplaces, nearly 80% of americans say they wish they could recapture some of the imagination, fun and creativity of their childhood. ruben ramirez, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: as 2012 winds down, the end of the year is often a time when we reflect. tonight, "lou's been thinking" about old friends and the best gift ever. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> in the past few weeks, i have lost three friends. i know it's part of getting older, and it still gets you thinking: how will we be measured? poet philip james bailey writes: we live in deeds, not years, in thoughts, not breaths, in feelings, not figures on a dial. there are many deeds to recount in business: profit and loss
flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essential divide, red vs. blue, yes. but also red vs. red. congress vs. the white house and when it came to foreign policy, whether and how to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when
been built in, rather than using some other technology that is newer, available -- it might be scary if your the person whose job is going to be lost when the data center goes down. >> at the heart of every internet enterprise our data centers, which are becoming more sprawling and ubiquitous as the amount of stored information explodes, starting in community after community. but the microsoft experience in quincy, washington shows that when these internet factories come to town, they can feel a bit more like old-time manufacturing than modern magic. what is the quincy, washington story? >> the story we set out to tell there was just sort of microsoft comes to town. it is a small town, around 7000 people. it has one quality that sets it apart from a lot of other small towns. it sits near the columbia river and a couple of hydroelectric dams that produce very cheap and continuous power. microsoft came to town in 2005 or so, 2006. what the story shows is that while you have this up-to-the- minute corporate image of what a digital company like microsoft is, it is a lot more like a tradi
as a country, it is a valuable technology. >> while the swedes are doing everything they can to minimize everything they can to minimize the waist, the paradox
is ted wong with webcor obayashi. we had two engineers being guest lectures at the technology part of tech 21. so they already had their presentations earlier this month. i was going to give you an update on our collective veterans hiring effort. i'm happy to say that we have two of our founding members in the room with us, manny flores and paula ressa of the carpenter's union. back in april we commenced a veteran's hiring steering committee, if you will, to look at issues of veterans geting into the construction field. we subsequently had two working group meetings with alameda workforce investment board, representatives, the edd there, as well as the carpenters' union and city build, as well as mission hiring hall. and what we came up with was essentially we found out that you needed to connect the dots with veterans hiring and a lot of organizations are out there working to support veterans, but nobody is really talking to each other and they are trying to individually reach out to employers and not really in a cohesive fashion. with unions and companies and cbos we needed to d
of a pilot aligned with the core curriculum standards and i work for a technology company and we're not at that level. preschool with core curriculum that makes for successful individuals. underserved kids particularly to do well in math in school. so there is a big difference between daycare and preschool and that is what we have a lack of is preschool. there are day-care centers. no one is arguing about the lack of and i think our own research found there is a daycare, but daycare didn't do is anything, particularly for kids of color. head start has been shown to be very ineffective, not to disrespectful. they provide a place for working families to place their children, but do not provide the generatation of a workforce of the future. i have to say that when we look at our priority principles and the general plan about serving families and neighbors who are serving youth and child-care, this is one of those issues that is equally as important. so i understand the concerns about noise. and it's actually interesting that we hear this a lot on people complaining about the loss
in terms of making technology available for businesses to utilize. so this will help expedite the processing of businesses enterprise tax forms for their employee tax credits. so the processing and administration and it should be making it easier for businesses in terms of even filling out their own forms. so this is now live, and available, and it's on the oewd website, when you go to the tax credit information on their oewd website. license 123, we're still targeting for our mid-january site to go live. we're still on track for that. >> great. >> and we should have for you -- we'll have a presentation for you at the january meeting. the small business net payroll exclusion, chrised forwarded you the press release that the tax and treasurer put out about it. there is no new form, but deals with it on the tax filing form. and and i think it should be pretty easy. small business saturday was a great success. san francisco did very well in terms of number of businesses participating, but we had a mayoral proclamation. the board of supervisors did a resolution. we had the ma
were we able to respond so effectively? certainly one important reason, because the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailors was superb. and we had absolutely first-class leadership in the navy. you will hear later today from admiral gary some examples of just how impressive that leadership is. the operational readiness of the fleet was a result, first of all, of having bases all around the world. but secondly because the strong program of exercise we conducted. the exercises were not only conducted on military scenarios, but we had an extensive set of exercises involved in humanitarian response. during the time i was secretary, we had a disaster response very similar to the one they're doing here in san francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last yea
no chances here. they put some of that salt on the streets. they're also using technology here. new technology to keep these streets clear of snow. they're called the remote sensory systems. 37 of them placed on the streets so the drivers of these plows will be able to tell which areas have snow accumulation that still needs to be cleared. across the river in new york city, similar technology also being used. we're told that drivers there in those plows will actually have the internet in their vehicles. they'll be able to see a google map type system what streets have been plowed and which streets need to be plowed. as far as the mta and public transportation, they meanwhile are putting commuters on stand by saying right now things are running smoothly. as that snow falls, there could be issues, particularly with freezing, they say. if freezing does occur, there could be some delays. right now, it is a game of wait and see. this area expecting a few inches of snow. right now, though, nothing in the air just yet. back to you in the studio. >> all right, jonathan. thank you. >>> and r
it be fuel for our cars or clothing or medicine that fights cancer? with our tree cell technology, we think it can. weyerhaeuser, growing our roots. [applause] >> this week on "inside washington," the thrill of victory -- >> barack obama has been reelected the 44th president. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles under. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> of natural disasters. >> it is like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> they are saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> of political fumbles. >> i have five seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the reelection of president barack obama. as "time"'s magazine cover states -- the president was person of the year -- barack obama will be the first democrat in more t
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